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Saturday, December 4 (9 am-12:30 pm)

Natural Heritage Series: Peirce Mill to Pulpit Rock

Leaders: Melanie Choukas-Bradley and Steve Dryden
Join Steve Dryden (author of Peirce Mill: Two Hundred Years in the Nation’s Capital) and Melanie Choukas-Bradley (author of City of Trees) for a winter stroll from Peirce Mill, which is nearing completion of a 10-year restoration, to the scenic crest of Pulpit Rock. Learn about the historic mill that has been grinding grain in the nation’s capital since before the Revolutionary War. Our leaders will share some of the history of Rock Creek Park as it celebrates 120 years as one of America’s first and most beloved federal parks. As we walk to Pulpit Rock at a leisurely pace, Melanie will point out the woody plants along the hillside above Rock Creek and teach some tricks for winter identification. Our distance will be 2-3 miles, on a mix of natural and paved-surface trails.  Most of the hike is over relatively flat terrain, but there will be a half mile of relatively-steep woodland trail.

Members: $20; Nonmembers: $28

Registration required, please use registration form


November 15, 2010, 8:00pm, doors open at 7:30pm

Please join the Silver Spring Garden Club for:

Sugarloaf, Our Closest Mountain Neighbor

A Slide Presentation by Author Melanie Choukas-Bradley

Celebrate seasonal beauty and regional history with a virtual tour of Sugarloaf Mountain, located in Maryland’s historic rural piedmont region. During the Civil War, Sugarloaf was an important lookout and signal station.

During the 1930s, it was FDR's first choice for a White House retreat.  Frank Lloyd Wright designed a dramatic project for the mountain summit that was later adapted for the Guggenheim Museum. Always a delightful destination for a hike, picnic, or weekend drive, Sugarloaf Mountain is still a haven for hundreds of flowering plants, including the lovely fringe-tree and the endangered yellow-fringed orchid.  In this slide presentation, you can experience Sugarloaf in all four seasons and learn highlights of its history, geology, and more.           

Melanie Choukas-Bradley is the author of two natural history books about Sugarloaf Mountain, Maryland (illustrated by Tina Thieme Brown) and City of Trees (illustrated by Polly Alexander). The author will sign copies of her books following the presentation.

WHEN: Monday, November 15, 8:00pm, doors open at 7:30pm
WHERE: Brookside Gardens Visitors Center/Education Building, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD
This event is FREE and is open to the general public.

Silver Spring Garden Club dues are just $10 per year per individual/couple/household. Please consider joining and supporting this great organization.


October 30, 2010, 9am-Noon

Casey Trees Historic Tree Walks with Melanie Choukas-Bradley
       Free, pre-registration required - register here.
www.caseytrees.org

US Capitol Tree Walk

Description:
Author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley will lead four historic tree walks for Casey Trees during 2010 and early 2011. Join us on these tours to learn about the integral role that trees have played in the evolution of our nation’s capital.

On October 30th, Melanie will be taking us on the THIRD walk in her series.  We will visit the grounds of the U.S. Capitol where official state trees from around the country will be blazing in full autumn glory. Learn about how President Lincoln urged construction of the half-finished Capitol dome to proceed during the uncertain Civil War years. Contemplate the Capitol grounds design that is the handiwork of Frederick Law Olmsted, the renowned 19th century landscape architect who also designed New York City’s Central Park.

Next Spring (2011), the fourth walk will take place at President Lincoln’s summer home during the Civil War. During the summers of 1862-1864 the Lincoln family resided at the Soldiers’ Home property (now known as the Armed Forces Retirement Home) in northwest DC, it was here that Lincoln rode on horseback the day before his assassination. Explore the noteworthy trees around the newly renovated Lincoln Cottage and pay a visit afterwards to nearby Rock Creek Cemetery. Rock Creek Cemetery is home to many historic trees and the gravesite of Alexander “Boss” Shepherd, who planted 60,000 trees during the 1870s as the second and last governor of DC, contributing to the lasting legacy known as the “City of Trees.”  This will be held on Saturday, April 16th.

You must sign up for each of four tree walks individually.  Space is limited.

If you would like to receive an autographed copy of City of Trees, check the box in the registration form and bring a $20 in cash or check made out to the University of Virginia Press to the walk.

Prerequisite: None and open to the public.

Instructor: Melanie Choukas Bradley, author of "City of Trees."
Date: Saturday, October 30th 2010
Time: 9:00 a.m. to noon.


October 16, 2010, 1:00pm - 3:30pm

United States Botanic Garden Tree Tour of Capitol Grounds

Autumn Tree Tour of the Capitol Grounds with Melanie Choukas-Bradley, author of City of Trees

Autumn is a magnificent time to appreciate the architecture and colorful foliage of the historic trees that grace the U.S. Capitol Grounds. We’ll meet in front of the Conservatory and stroll around the Capitol, admiring and learning about its grand old tree specimens from around the country and the world, including many official state trees and memorial plantings. We’ll focus on autumn fruits and leaves and learn how to identify diverse species of oak, maple, beech, buckeye and many other trees. A large pecan and a massive willow oak are among the trees we’ll encounter. Ms. Choukas-Bradley will share history of the Capitol Grounds and the city of Washington. Binoculars optional but recommended. Please note: This tour will take place outside. Please dress for the weather and wear sunscreen.

FREE: Pre-registration required: register online www.usbg.gov or call (202) 225-1116


October 9, 2010, 9:00am - Noon

Casey Trees Historic Tree Walk with Melanie Choukas-Bradley, author of “City of Trees.”

Rock Creek Park Tree Walk

Free, Pre-Registration Required

www.caseytrees.org

Author and naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley will lead us on two historic tree tours in October: the first walk at Rock Creek Park (October 9th), which is celebrating its 120th anniversary this year. Learn to identify magnificent specimens of native oaks, maples, ashes, and hickories that grace the winding paths through the urban woodland park. Hear about conservation issues that were as relevant in 1890 as they are in 2010. During the second walk attendees visit the grounds of the U.S. Capitol (October 30th) where official state trees from around the country will be blazing in full autumn glory. Learn about how President Lincoln urged construction of the half-finished Capitol dome to proceed during the uncertain Civil War years. Contemplate the Capitol grounds design that is the handiwork of Frederick Law Olmsted, the renowned 19th century landscape architect who also designed New York City’s Central Park.

You must sign up for each of tree walk individually. Space is limited.

If you would like to receive an autographed copy of City of Trees, check the box in the registration form and bring a $20 in cash or check made out to the University of Virginia Press to the walk.

Code:  

TW100910

When:  

Saturday, October 9, 2010

  Where:  

The Nature Center at Rock Creek Park

  Time:  

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

 Fee:  

Free



July 22, 2010, Thursday evening 5:00-7:00

United States Botanic Garden "Trees of the Regional Garden"
Melanie Choukas-Bradley, Author of City of Trees

Spend a summer evening learning to identify trees of the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont and Coastal Plan as you tour the Regional Garden. Melanie will trach you how to identify tupelo, hop hornbeam, red buckeye, pawpaw, oaks, pines, and many other native trees as you stroll the grounds of the National Garden. She will also share some of the arboreal history of Washington, DC, which has long been known as the "City of Trees," and offer ideas for self-guided tree tours in and around the nation's capitol.

Code: TH072210
Date: Thursday, July 22
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Garden Lawn Terrace
FREE: Pre-registration required: register online www.usbg.gov or call (202) 225-1116

United States Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20001
Contact Us | 202-225-8333


July 7-28, 2010, Wednesday 7:00-9:00pm

Natural History Field Studies Course
Co-Sponsored by the Audubon Naturalist Society and the Graduate School

Summer Wildflower Identification (Classroom-Evening/Weekend)

Instructor: Melanie Choukas-Bradley

Code: NATH1149E
Type: Classroom-Evening/Weekend
Length: Weeks
Credit: 1 ACE
Cost: $259

 

  Woodend Sanctuary
8940 Jones Mill Road
Free parking
Chevy Chase, MD

You can register for this class through the graduate school or audubonnaturalist.org.

Instructor Bio:
Melanie Choukas-Bradley is the author of three natural history books and a free-lance nature writer for the Washington Post, Naturalist News and other publications. She serves on the board of the Maryland Native Plant Society and authors their bi-monthly "Wildflower in Focus" column. Melanie frequently leads field trips for the Audubon Naturalist Society and other organizations. Melanie received her BA in English from the University of Vermont. She also attended Pierce College in Athens, Greece as an undergraduate.

Overview:
From milkweeds and morning glories to orchids and asters, summer presents a diverse array of wildflowers for study of plant family characteristics and ways to identify different species. Field trips to two scenic locations for summer wildflowers provide an opportunity for practice in the use of identification guides. Previous Spring Flower Identification class or similar course is recommended but not required. Field Trips: July 17 and July 24.

This course is part of the Certificate of Accomplishment in Natural History Field Studies.



Saturday, May 22 (10am- 3pm)

Spring Hike on Sugarloaf Mountain, Audubon Naturalist Society

Leaders: Melanie-Choukas Bradley and Tina Brown
Join Sugarloaf author Melanie Choukas-Bradley and illustrator Tina Brown for an outing devoted to the botany, wildlife, geology, and history of Sugarloaf Mountain, a monadnock in the rural Piedmont northwest of Washington, DC. The 1.5-2.5 mile hike, with some uphill and downhill on rocky terrain, is timed to coincide with the flowering of many woodland plants, including fringe-tree, pinxter, Canada Mayflower, an uncommon form of Jack-in-the-Pulpit, several violet species, and possibly one or more orchids. Bring binoculars to look for wood thrushes, worm-eating warblers, ravens, and other bird species. Tina will give a brief demonstration on illustrating plants in the field during our lunch break.

Members: $25; Nonmembers: $35
Registration required, please use registration form.


April 22, 2010, Thursday evening 7:00pm

Discover the Stories Behind Washington's Lush Trees at the DC Public Library.
Celebrate Earth Day with Local Author Melanie Choukas-Bradley.

(Washington, DC) What stories do the trees in your neighborhood tell? Are any of them willow oaks? If so, Thomas Jefferson, who designed and executed the first DC street tree planting on record, would have loved them. Learn more about Washington's trees on April 22nd at 7:00 pm, when author Melanie
Choukas-Bradley gives a lecture at the Cleveland Park Neighborhood Library
entitled "City of Trees."

Choukas-Bradley will take the public on a virtual tour of Washington's botanic history and diversity. She will share pictures and stories behind the trees in Cleveland Park, the White House, the Capitol, Mount Vernon and other historic sites.

Choukas-Bradley has written three natural-history books including"City of Trees: The Complete Field Guide to the Trees of Washington, DC" In addition, Choukas-Bradley has been a long-time free-lance contributor to The Washington Post and other publications. A book sale and signing of her book courtesy
of Books-A-Million, will follow the program.

The Cleveland Park Neighborhood Library located at 3310 Connecticut Ave., NW near the Cleveland Park Metro Station. All District of Columbia Library activities are free. For more information, please call 202- 282-3080. Click here for flyer.


April 17, 2010, 8:45am-12pm

Tree Tour of Historic Frederick Douglass's Home (“Cedar Hill”), Washington, DC, Casey Trees

Discover historic Cedar Hill, Frederick Douglass's family home overlooking the Anacostia River, with Melanie Choukas Bradley. Marvel at the impressive views stretching past Navy Yard and tour the ground's historic collection of trees. Participants will also be treated to a guided tour of the home led by U.S. National Park Service staff. Bring your camera and binoculars!

Code: TW101009                 
Date: Saturday, April 17, 2010 
Location: 1411 W. St. SE
Time:  8:45am to 12pm
Fee: Free

Preregistration required www.caseytrees.org

Questions: Carol Herwig, 202-349-1907 or cherwig@caseytrees.org




January 30, 2010, 9am-2pm
April 10, 2010, 9am-2pm
June 12, 2010, 9am-2pm
November 6, 2010, 9am-2pm

A Year at Boundary Bridge, Audubon Naturalist Society www.audubonnaturalist.org
Saturdays (9 am-2 pm)
     Section A: January 30
     Section B: April 10
     Section C: June 12
     Section D: November 6
Leader: Melanie Choukas-Bradley

(ANS Boundary Bridge walks with Melanie Choukas-Bradley will continue in 2011 on January 29, April 9, June 18 and October 29.)

Melanie Choukas-Bradley at Carderock
Photo by Sophie Choukas-Bradley

Join the author of City of Trees for a series of hikes in one of Washington, DC’s most beautiful wild areas. Starting at Boundary Bridge and following the same 2.5 mile loop trail each season, we’ll explore the large trees, diverse shrubs, and exceptional wildflowers along a scenic stretch of Rock Creek, just inside the Maryland/ District Line. We’ll also see and hear many species of birds, butterflies, and amphibians. On our winter walk, an ideal time to admire the Park’s topography, we’ll look and listen for winter flocks

Melanie Choukas-Bradley with Virginia Bluebells on an Audubon Naturalist Society walk near Rock Creek. 
Photo by Kathy Reiser.

and identify many species of woody plants. In April, we’ll witness the spring magic of Rock Creek’s myriad wildflowers. As summer arrives in the Park, we’ll hope for a glimpse of a kingfisher as we look for ferns and early seasonal wildflowers such as enchanter’s nightshade. Autumn is glorious in Rock Creek Park, and we’ll conclude our series with a walk through colorful oaks, maples, and ashes, searching for the flowers of an early witch hazel in bloom. Our 2.5 mile circuit hike will be on trails with moderate uphill and downhill walking.


Each walk: Members: $25; Nonmembers: $35
Two walks:  Members: $44; Nonmembers: $62
Three walks: Members: $63; Nonmembers: $88
Entire series:  Members: $80; Nonmembers: $112
Registration required. Please use the registration form.


February 20 (Snow/Rain Date: February 27), 1- 3pm

United States Botanic Garden Winter Tree Tour of Capitol Grounds

Melanie Choukas–Bradley, Author of City of Trees

Winter is the best time to appreciate the architecture of the historic trees that grace the U.S. Capitol Grounds. We’ll meet in front of the Conservatory and stroll around the Capitol, admiring and learning about its magnificent trees from around the country and the world, including many official state trees and memorial plantings. We’ll learn how to identify Kentucky coffee trees, Japanese pagoda trees, beeches, magnolias, and dogwoods during winter, and focus on the bark, buds, and overall growth habit of grand old specimens. Giant sequoias and a massive willow oak are among the trees we’ll see. Ms. Choukas-Bradley will share history of the Capitol Grounds and the city of Washington. Binoculars optional but recommended. Please note: This tour will take place outside. Please dress warm. Snow/rain date is February 27.

Code: TH022010; Date: Saturday, February 20 (Snow/Rain Date: February 27); Time: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Conservatory Terrace; Cost: Friends - Free, Nonmembers - $8

Pre-registration required by calling 202-225-1116 or www.usbg.gov


March 7, 2010, 12:30-4:30pm

Winter Woods of Sugarloaf, Audubon Naturalist Society www.audubonnaturalist.org

Leaders: Melanie Choukas-Bradley and Tina Thieme Brown
Explore the winter woods of Sugarloaf Mountain with the co-authors/illustrators of two books on this monadnock’s natural and cultural history. We’ll hike from 1-3 miles, depending on trail and weather conditions, stopping to identify woody plants along the way, including oak species, heath family members, and the summit’s noteworthy table mountain pines. We’ll keep an eye out for seasonal birds, including chickadees, kinglets, woodpeckers, and even tundra swans. Melanie will talk about the mountain’s history and geology. Tina will share tips on gathering field information for your art/nature journal.  Our hike will include some uphill/downhill walking and, depending on trail conditions, a fairly steep ¼ mile hike up to the summit - all at a slow pace.
Members: $23; Nonmembers: $32
Registration required. Please use the registration form.


Nature photographs by Melanie Choukas-Bradley and Polly Alexander.

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